Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease increases the risk of Parkinson’s disease

A Danish nationwide cohort study 1977-2014.

Susana Aznar Kleijn.

Objective

Intestinal inflammation has been suggested to play a role in development of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). To test the hypothesis that IBD is associated with risk of PD and MSA, we performed a nationwide population-based cohort study.

 Design

The cohort consisted of all individuals diagnosed with IBD in Denmark during 1977-2014 (n=76 477) and non-IBD individuals from the general population, who were comparable in terms of gender, age and vital status (n=7 548 259). All cohort members were followed from IBD diagnosis/index date to occurrence of PD and MSA (according to the Danish National Patient Register).

Results

Patients with IBD had a 22% increased risk of PD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.22; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.35). The increased risk was present independently of age at IBD diagnosis, gender or length of follow-up. The overall incidence of MSA was low in our study, and the regression analysis suggested a tendency towards higher risk of developing MSA in patients with IBD as compared with non-IBD individuals (HR=1.41; 95% CI 0.82 to 2.44). Estimates were similar for women and men. The increased risk of parkinsonism was significantly higher among patients with UC (HR=1.35; 95% CI 1.20 to 1.52) and not significantly different among patients with Crohn’s disease (HR=1.12; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.40).

Conclusions

This nationwide, unselected, cohort study shows a significant association between IBD and later occurrence of PD, which is consistent with recent basic scientific findings of a potential role of GI inflammation in development of parkinsonian disorders.

Villumsen M1, Aznar S2, Pakkenberg B2,3, Jess T1, Brudek T2.

  1. Center for Clinical Research and Disease Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  2. Research Laboratory for Stereology and Neuroscience, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  3. Faculty of Health, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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